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2021 Goods and Services Delivered $38,000,000 (est.)
2021 Overhead: Less than 5%
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The bridge between you and America’s troops

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America's Military Charity® 501(c)(3)
2021 Goods and Services Delivered $38,000,000 (est.)
2021 Overhead: Less than 5%
Donate Today

Providing assistance to and promoting support
for America’s troops and their families

SUPPORT OUR TROOPS®
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America's Military Charity® 501(c)(3)
2021 Goods and Services Delivered $38,000,000 (est.)
2021 Overhead: Less than 5%
Donate Today

Serving Those Who Serve

SUPPORT OUR TROOPS®
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Donate Today
America's Military Charity® 501(c)(3)
2021 Goods and Services Delivered $38,000,000 (est.)
2021 Overhead: Less than 5%

If they’re there, we’re with them

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KEKAHA, Hawaii (Aug. 16, 2021) A Navy Marine Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System (NMESIS) launcher deploys into position onboard Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands. The NMESIS and its Naval Strike Missiles participated in a live-fire exercise as part of Large Scale Exercise (LSE) 2021. During the training, a Marine Corps fires expeditionary advanced base (EAB) sensed, located, identified and struck a target ship at sea, which required more than 100 nautical miles of missile flight. The fires EAB Marines developed a targeting solution for a joint force of seapower and airpower which struck the ship as the Marines displaced to a new firing position. The Marine Corps EAB Operations concept is a core component of the Force Design 2030 modernization effort. Photo by Major Nick Mannweiler.KEKAHA, Hawaii (Aug. 16, 2021) A Navy Marine Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System (NMESIS) launcher deploys into position onboard Pacific Missile Range Facility Barking Sands. The NMESIS and its Naval Strike Missiles participated in a live-fire exercise as part of Large Scale Exercise (LSE) 2021. During the training, a Marine Corps fires expeditionary advanced base (EAB) sensed, located, identified and struck a target ship at sea, which required more than 100 nautical miles of missile flight. The fires EAB Marines developed a targeting solution for a joint force of seapower and airpower which struck the ship as the Marines displaced to a new firing position. The Marine Corps EAB Operations concept is a core component of the Force Design 2030 modernization effort. Photo by Major Nick Mannweiler.

Marine Corps Base Quantico, VA --

The Marine Corps’ top modernization priority is fulfilling the requirement for a ground-based anti-ship missile capability.

The operational requirement for this ship-killing capability is a relatively new development stemming from the Commandant’s Planning Guidance and the Corps’ Force Design 2030 efforts.

Get them what they need

“As the Marine Corps’ first Ground Based Anti-Ship Missile capability, the Navy/Marine Corps Expeditionary Ship Interdiction System is a force modernization priority central to the Marine Corps’ contribution to the Naval expeditionary force’s anti-surface warfare campaign,” said Lt. Col. John Fraser, Fires branch head at Marine Corps Combat Development Directorate, Combat Development and Integration.

Project Convergence 21 - Tactical Robotic Controller

U.S. Army Pfc. Daniel Candales, assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division, uses the tactical robotic controller to control the expeditionary modular autonomous vehicle as a practice exercise in preparation for Project Convergence at Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz., October 19, 2021. During Project Convergence 21, Soldiers are experimenting with using the vehicle for semi-autonomous reconnaissance and re-supply.

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