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America's Military Charity® 501(c)(3)
2021 Goods and Services Delivered $38,000,000 (est.)
2021 Overhead: Less than 5%
Donate Today

Providing assistance to and promoting support
for America’s troops and their families

SUPPORT OUR TROOPS®
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America's Military Charity® 501(c)(3)
2021 Goods and Services Delivered $38,000,000 (est.)
2021 Overhead: Less than 5%
Donate Today

Serving Those Who Serve

SUPPORT OUR TROOPS®
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Donate Today
America's Military Charity® 501(c)(3)
2021 Goods and Services Delivered $38,000,000 (est.)
2021 Overhead: Less than 5%

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SUPPORT OUR TROOPS®

Army Master Sgt. Brian Chapman, Information Systems Division Non-commissioned Officer in Charge for U.S. Army Central G6 adjusts their Tampa 1.3M satellite dish during validation for the new Relocatable Emergency Command Post at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, April 12 2021. This technology further develops the capabilities and increases the U.S. Armed Forces overall readiness. (Photo by Sgt. Robert Torres)Army Master Sgt. Brian Chapman, Information Systems Division Non-commissioned Officer in Charge for U.S. Army Central G6 adjusts their Tampa 1.3M satellite dish during validation for the new Relocatable Emergency Command Post at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, April 12 2021. This technology further develops the capabilities and increases the U.S. Armed Forces overall readiness. (Photo by Sgt. Robert Torres)

KUWAIT 04.22.2021 –  CAMP ARIFJAN, Kuwait - The ability to adapt is widely considered to be one of the most important qualities a person can achieve. Soldiers with U.S. Army Central’s Information Systems Division (ISD) G6 have a firm understanding of just that important role adaptability plays in readiness.

ISD G6 Soldiers recently conducted a validation exercise here ensuring accuracy and certification of the new Relocatable Emergency Command Post (RECP), by doing a side-by-side analysis between old and new equipment sets.

Secure communications are a top priority for the unique nature of Special Forces missions, such as the one pictured featuring a U.S. Army Special Forces Soldier, attached to Special Operations Task Force-Afghanistan, providing security prior to an assault in the Alingar district, Laghman province, Afghanistan, Feb. 18, 2018. Recently fielded, the Tactical Key Loader, developed specifically for Special Operations Forces due to its smaller, dimmer screen and one-button key fill capability, provides cryptographic keys that block unauthorized individuals from accessing mission information. (photo by Sgt. Connor Mendez)Secure communications are a top priority for the unique nature of Special Forces missions, such as the one pictured featuring a U.S. Army Special Forces Soldier, attached to Special Operations Task Force-Afghanistan, providing security prior to an assault in the Alingar district, Laghman province, Afghanistan, Feb. 18, 2018. Recently fielded, the Tactical Key Loader, developed specifically for Special Operations Forces due to its smaller, dimmer screen and one-button key fill capability, provides cryptographic keys that block unauthorized individuals from accessing mission information. (photo by Sgt. Connor Mendez)

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (June 1, 2021) – U.S. Special Operations Forces have a new aid in the fight against cyber-attacks.

The Tactical Key Loader (TKL) cryptographic key device, which answers the Army’s call for the Next Generation Load Device-Small (NGLD-S), provides critical command and control of emergency, time sensitive and secure communications during Special Forces missions.

The device is a smaller, faster version of the Simple Key Loader (SKL), which is currently fielded across the Army.

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