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U.S. Marine Corps Shannon and Nicole LaVine Sisters Carry on Family Tradition

 By Sgt. Ryan E. Ohare Marine Forces Pacific CAMP H.M. SMITH, Hawaii, Jan. 25, 2006 - The United States Marine Corps is a service rich in tradition and customs. For centuries, sons and daughters have followed in the footsteps of their parents and grandparents by earning the title of U.S. Marine. For the LaVine family, this tradition now stretches four generations. Chief Warrant Officer 3 Lauren LaVine, the Marine Corps Forces Pacific Band officer, swore in his two daughters Jan. 23 at the military entrance processing station aboard Naval Station, Pearl Harbor. [caption id="attachment_2986" align="alignleft" width="308"]camp_hm.sisters_carry_on_family_tradition U.S. Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer 3 Lauren LaVine signs the enlistment contract for his two daughters, Nicole and Shannon, after they were sworn into the Marine Corps Jan 23, at Naval Station, Pearl Harbor. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ryan E. Ohare[/caption] His daughters, Shannon and Nicole, held their heads high as they repeated the oath their father proudly recited to them; the same oath that not only their father, but their grandfather and great grandfather had spoken before them. "My first reaction when they told me they were joining the Corps was a complete surprise," said LaVine, "I was thrilled to hear they chose the Marines."His daughters, Shannon and Nicole, held their heads high as they repeated the oath their father proudly recited to them; the same oath that not only their father, but their grandfather and great grandfather had spoken before them. According to LaVine, their family has had a Marine continually in service since 1942, and after he retires next year, his daughters will carry on the torch of tradition. Nicole, his youngest daughter, looks forward to Parris Island and the change in lifestyle that awaits her. "I think this is going to be a great stepping stone for me," said Nicole. "The Marine Corps is the most challenging and elite of the services, and that is what I'm looking for." When asked how it felt to be sworn into the Marines by their father, Nicole responded, "Awesome." "It's really an honor for me to be sworn in by my father," stated Nicole, a native of Overland Park, Kan. "When we first told him that we signed up, he thought we were playing a prank on him. Once he knew we weren't joking, he was very proud of our choice." LaVine said he didn't push military service on his daughters while they were growing up. "We had talked about it from time to time," said LaVine. "Mainly the values you receive in the military and what it's like to give back to your country. I had no idea that it was something that they were interested in." Although they joined together, they chose different career fields they felt suited their individual personalities. Nicole will become a combat photographer, while her older sister Shannon will attend school as an aviation technician. "I really wanted to be crash, fire, rescue," said Shannon, "But they said I was too short, so an aviation technician was my second choice." When asked how they were looking forward to Boot camp, Shannon responded. "I'm eager to get started, so that I can get it over with. I know it's going to be hard, but once I'm done, I'm looking forward to saying that I did it." Since Nicole and Shannon are shipping out the same night, they will also be in the same platoon at Parris Island. "I think it will make me feel stronger knowing that I have my sister with me," replied Nicole. "I think that no matter who you are, tough situations tend to bind people together, so I'm glad she'll be there along side me."      
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