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60,000 Bags of M&Ms to Troops in Afghanistan!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERANovember 3, 2009 - How do you brighten up the day of someone who's feeling a bit neglected?   M&Ms! About $90,000 worth! SupportOurTroops.Org has just shipped two pallets of M&Ms® to field hospital and commissary-gift type huts soldiers first reach when they fall back from the front lines.   A fun thank-you and morale booster straight from the civilians here at home to tell them we know they are there, appreciate them, and are doing everything we can as civilians to support them. Who did this?  Support Our Troops® and an Eagles chapter in Florida teamed up to pull this off for the troops. Does your company have anything we could send to the troops? Would your chain store run one of our programs to collect goods for the troops and their families or help us raise money? Isn't it time to show them how much your company cares? Contact us!

Meet Your Military: Immigrant Serves Adopted Country

[caption id="attachment_3052" align="alignleft" width="250"]FOD_ImmigrantServes Army Spc. Meirong Wang hands out mail at her forward operating base in Afghanistan's Nangarhar province. A native of China's Fujian province, Wang serves with Task Force Mountain Warrior. U.S. Air Force photo by Capt. Melissa Milner[/caption] NANGARHAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan, Oct. 28, 2009 – A native of China’s Fujian province who was not in the United States long before she decided to serve her adopted country says the dedication of her fellow soldiers helps to inspire her own service. Army Spc. Meirong Wang was about to finish her college degree and start teaching high school physics when she was granted the opportunity to leave China and travel to the United States. “When you see a different country, it’s not about the country or the area, it’s about the people,” she said of her decision to leave China. “People are brave to stand up for the things [they] want to fight for.” Wang said she is proud to be here, and cited the discipline required in the military as something that makes it different from any other career. “As long as you maintain discipline, you want to do better,” she said. A human resources specialist for Task Force Mountain Warrior’s 4th Special Troops Battalion, Wang uses her discipline to better herself every day. “Specialist Wang makes my job easy,” said Army Sgt. 1st Class Jason A. Coulter, Wang’s noncommissioned officer in charge. “Her work ethic, attention to detail and willingness to take on responsibilities [make her] the type of soldier leaders want and the Army needs.” Though Wang’s discipline and desire to do better drive her every day, Coulter said, she still faces some challenges as she works to overcome the language barrier. “Specialist Wang has identified that as a weakness, and has improved her English tremendously,” he said. “As leaders, we identify our weaknesses and seek self-improvement. Wang has many characteristics of a leader, and that is just one of them.” Wang attributes much of her success to her fellow soldiers and leaders. In the process that led to her being named as Task Force Mountain Warrior’s soldier of the quarter, Wang had to face many challenges and her teammates helped her to prepare. Even though the competition was an individual event, she noted, it still took a team effort for her be selected. “So many people stood behind me and supported me,” Wang said, adding that her leaders want her to be a good leader as well. “They also tell my comrades we need to support each other to be good leaders,” she said. Coulter proudly recalled how Wang’s fellow soldiers helped her prepare for the evaluation board. “Specialist Wang and her co-workers pulled together as a team; they went to the gym together, woke up early and did physical training,” he said. “And the team drilled her with evaluation board questions daily.” The support paid off in Wang’s selection as soldier of the quarter. “There’s no way I could win this board without everyone here,” she said. Coulter said it’s typical of Wang to give credit to her leadership and fellow soldiers. “She is an unselfish soldier [who] exemplifies selfless service,” he said. Wednesday, 28 October 2009: By Army Spc. Eugene H. Cushing whom serves in the Task Force Mountain Warrior public affairs office- Special to American Forces Press Service. ***SOT***
 

   

Civilians Show Troops in Afghanistan They're Not Forgotten

Mature man in foam ready to shave his face and headOctober 27, 2009 16,800 samplers of men's facial products is shipping out to  Marine combat units in Afghanistan, thanks to SupportOurTroops.Org and Crabtree & Evelyn. The troops really need to hear we are still with them, especially those in Afghanistan who need to hear from us the most right now.  They are far, and we need to show them they are not forgotten during times of uncertainty. Each sampler contains 1 Naturals Men's Face Scrub mix, 1 Natural Men's Shave mix, and 1 Naturals Men's shave cream.  Extras the troops are eager to get. It is destined for field hospital and commissary-gift type huts soldiers reach first when they fall back from the front lines. Who did this? SupportOurTroops.org, and its cooperating partner Crabtree & Evelyn teamed up to pull this off. On behalf of America's troops and the families, SupportOurTroops.Org thanks Crabtree & Evelyn for making this possible. Does your company have anything we could send to the troops? Would your chain store run one of our programs to collect goods for the troops and their families or help us raise money? Isn't it time to show them how much your company cares?

Meet Your Military: Marine Keeps Vehicles Rolling

HELMAND PROVINCE, Afghanistan, Oct. 27, 2009 – Within a week of arriving here, Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Gary Mishoe is preparing his motor pool for his unit’s takeover of counterinsurgency operations in the province.
From preventive maintenance to headlight and tire checks on the unit’s Humvees and 7-ton trucks, Mishoe works to ensure his fellow Marines will have safe and operable vehicles throughout their deployment. Mishoe, a 27-year-old Marine from Virginia Beach, Va., is deployed as a motor transport operator with Regimental Combat Team 7, which will conduct counterinsurgency operations in support of Afghan forces throughout the province.But his path from Virginia Beach to Afghanistan was not a simple high school-to-boot camp route.Within a year of graduating from high school in 2002, Mishoe secured a spot on the assembly line at a car assembly plant in Norfolk, Va. His job was simple: assemble drive shafts. The task earned him about $75,000 a year. Life was good. “I felt very secure. I had a good job, an apartment, bought a new car and had a family,” Mishoe said. “I thought I was going to retire there.” But four years later, the assembly plant couldn’t survive a weakened economy and its effect on the auto industry. He received three months notice that the plant was shutting down. “I got a $100,000 severance package. But I still needed a job,” said Mishoe, who had a wife, toddler and baby on the way. The Virginian’s life revolved around the auto industry as far back as he can remember. His mother had worked at the same assembly line 10 years earlier. “When I was in high school, I would wash some of my mom’s co-worker’s cars. I was a kid, washing these people’s cars, and then I found myself working right next to them on the assembly line,” he said. Following the layoff, Mishoe traveled up and down the East Coast, securing modeling gigs at New York fashion shows, and eventually following his wife to Atlanta. It was there that he decided to accept a commitment he’s always had on his mind: to enlist as a U.S. Marine. He knew the challenge ahead. “I knew it was going to be hard,” he said. “I knew I had to work for it. But I was willing to do it.” Mishoe knew he was enlisting in a wartime Marine Corps, and was fully aware of the chance that he may deploy to either Iraq or Afghanistan. “I wanted to come out here and do what Marines do,” he said. “I’ve been training since boot camp to do this, and here I am.” Mishoe enlisted Aug. 11, 2007, and after graduating from Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S.C., he completed follow-on training at Camp Geiger, N.C., and Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., where he learned how to become a motor transport operator. “Working for Ford was tougher, not because of the job itself, but because of the lack of a team attitude. I was doing the job by myself,” he said. “There’s a lot more pride in the Marine Corps. If you’re struggling, there’s always someone to help. There’s always that team spirit.” Mishoe looks forward to heading out of the forward operating base and into the country roads, driving convoys and leading Marines. “I want to learn about the Afghan culture, what they’ve been through,” he said. “I believe that we are helping them in a turning point in their civilization. It’s good that we are here.” He also hopes to do some soul-searching. “The Marine Corps has helped me become a better father, husband and person,” he said. “Now, I want to learn about myself, about my limits,” he said. After completing his yearlong deployment, Mishoe said, he hopes to secure a spot at the Marine Inspector/Instructor staff at Chesapeake, Va., about 15 miles from the Ford plant where he used to work. The days of the lucrative assembly line are a distant memory, and the plant’s closing may have been a blessing in disguise. “I’m thinking about the here and now, and the future,” Mishoe said. “My prayers were answered. I got what I wanted. I’m a Marine.” (Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Luis R. Agostini serves with Regimental Combat Team 7.) October 27, 2009: By Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Luis R. Agostini-  Special to American Forces Press Service 000logo_news_distributionRedistributed by www.SupportOurTroops.org
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