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Biofreeze roll on

U.S. April 14, 2019 –

The SOT Team is often so busy performing the mission there’s little time to talk about it.  In the vein of catching up SOT is pleased to report that in late November 2018, SOT granted and delivered for free 4,052 Biofreeze 3 oz Professional Gel Roll-ons to the Texas Airborne Angel Cadets for use in their care packages to troops deployed overseas.

Approved by military use the Biofreeze National Stocking Number is #6505-01-599-0068.

SOT also delivered for free 4,052 Biofreeze 3 oz Professional Gel Roll-ons to the South Carolina National Guard.

4,052 Biofreeze 3 oz Professional Gel Roll-ons went to the Idaho National Guard for free.

And 12,156 Biofreeze 3 oz Professional Gel Roll-ons were delivered for free to the Florida National Guard.

SOT supplies all military units, branches, domestic and abroad.  

The total value of these MWR care goods shipments was $127,152.

The supply of these requested goods was made possible by the great people who make Biofreeze – a great muscle balm and a terrific alternative to opioids for pain relief.   Learn more about managing pain relief here.

This PDF helps you learn more about how doctors, therapists and patients are shifting toward topical analgesics like Biofreeze and away from systemic pain relievers.

Dr. Scholl’s steps up for the troops!

dr.scholls Massaging Gel Pressure Point front 300U.S., April 2, 2019.  

10,656 pairs Dr. Scholl’s insoles are heading to Iraq and Afghanistan via our NC Distribution Hub.  A value of $115,937 in tangible support.

An army travels on its feet, especially in desert and mountain terrain, and requested items like this enhance morale and mission effectiveness.   

It was made possible by Bayer Pharmaceuticals which ran a nationwide buy one GIVE one campaign in which Americans buying Dr. Scholl’s insoles caused a pair to be donated to Support Our Troops.

A big thank you to Dr. Scholl’s, Bayer Healthcare, and all the great Americans who stepped up for their troops!

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Meet Your Military: What's in a Name? Demystifying the Collective Services

Did you know that terms people use to describe the services collectively aren't interchangeable? For instance, "the military services" and "the armed forces" don’t mean the same thing.

Here's a quick guide to the various terms:

Military Services

Soldiers assigned to Alpha Battery, 4th Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment, fire a M119 105 mm howitzer during exercise Dynamic Front 19 at Torun, Poland, March 5, 2019. Photo By: Army Spc. Rolyn KropfSoldiers assigned to Alpha Battery, 4th Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment, fire a M119 105 mm howitzer during exercise Dynamic Front 19 at Torun, Poland, March 5, 2019.
Photo By: Army Spc. Rolyn Kropf

The military services are all part of the Defense Department.

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Meet Your Military: Why Are Marines Part of the Navy?

Historically, marines serve as a navy’s ground troops. In fact, the word "marine" is the French word for sea, which may be why the French military historically called English troops — who all had to arrive by sea — "marines."Historically, marines serve as a navy’s ground troops. In fact, the word "marine" is the French word for sea, which may be why the French military historically called English troops — who all had to arrive by sea — "marines."

Did you ever wonder why the Marine Corps is part of the Department of the Navy? 

Ship crews engage in hand-to-hand combat during a mock sea battle in a flooded Roman amphitheater in an 1894 painting by Spanish painter Ulpiano Checa. The real-life sea battles such as this one imitated gave rise to today’s Marine Corps.Ship crews engage in hand-to-hand combat during a mock sea battle in a flooded Roman amphitheater in an 1894 painting by Spanish painter Ulpiano Checa. The real-life sea battles such as this one imitated gave rise to today’s Marine Corps.

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Meet Your Military: Master of Battle

Master of Battle Support our troops Meet your Military

Army Sgt. Richard McDonald, a military police soldier assigned to the U.S. Army Central commander’s protective service detail, was recently certified as a master combatives instructor. Now, McDonald, along with other Arcent personnel, leads a group of soldiers in obtaining their Modern Army Combatives Program Level 2 certification at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait.

Why did you join the Army?

I joined the Army to become a police officer. Ever since I was a kid I wanted to become a police officer or was very interested in their line of duty. I tried college and it wasn’t my thing. I’m more hands on then anything. I figured the military was the way to go. After looking into branches, the Army caught my eye the most.

What made you decide to get into combatives?

Combatives was honestly something I’ve never looked to pursue. I did go to [the] Basic Combatives Course and Tactical Combatives Course, although I did enjoy it, [I’d] never even thought about going to Master Combatives Course. It’s a very hard school and I didn’t think I would ever be cut out for it. But when the opportunity arose, I couldn’t say no. I took the chance to attend the course and succeeded in completing. It had to be the most physical and mentally demanding course I’ve attended in my career so far.

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Meet Your Military: Middle East medevac mission is 'best in the military'

U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to the 2-211th General Support Aviation Battalion, Minnesota Army National Guard, and the 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team, Mississippi Army National Guard, pull a patient from a UH-60L Black Hawk helicopter during an aeromedical evacuation rehearsal at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, Dec. 11, 2018. (Photo by Sgt. Emily Finn)U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to the 2-211th General Support Aviation Battalion, Minnesota Army National Guard, and the 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team, Mississippi Army National Guard, pull a patient from a UH-60L Black Hawk helicopter during an aeromedical evacuation rehearsal at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, Dec. 11, 2018. Photo by Sgt. Emily Finn

CAMP BUEHRING, Kuwait – Looking out to a vast horizon, where the brown, sandy dunes of Kuwait's desert meet the blue sky, appears a UH-60L Black Hawk helicopter with a red cross on the door. The red cross is an international sign of medical assistance and a sign of hope for those in need.

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