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Guard dual status allows flexibility, rapid COVID-19 response

photo by nat guard bureau support our troops

To date, a smaller number of Guard members have been activated under Title 32, 502 F, United States Code, or state activation that is federally funded. In this duty status, the primary change is the funding source. Guard members remain under the command and control of their governor. However, this type of activation requires approval by the secretary of defense and is generally used when a federal emergency is declared. Guard members and their families are also entitled to the same benefits as the active component.

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National Guard Ramping Up Wuhan Virus COVID-19 Response

National Guard Wuhan Coronavirus Support Our Troops

ARLINGTON, VA, March 19, 2020 – About 2,050 National Guard Soldiers and Airmen in 27 states have been activated to support COVID-19 response efforts, the chief of the National Guard Bureau said Thursday. Air Force Gen. Joseph L. Lengyel told reporters at a Pentagon briefing that number most likely would double by the weekend, and it is even possible that tens of thousands of Guard members could be activated as the situation unfolds, depending on the needs of communities.

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COVID-19 (aka Coronavirus 19, Wuhan Virus) DoD Stop Movement Order Issued

Immediate Release

20-03-19 Covid-19

pdfDOD Stop-Travel-Coronavirus-2019.PDF1.06 MB 

March 13, 2020 - Today, the Deputy Secretary of Defense David L. Norquist approved new travel restrictions for service members, DoD civilians, and their families assigned to DoD installations, facilities and surrounding areas within the United States and its territories. This restriction will halt all domestic travel, including Permanent Change of Station, and Temporary Duty. This restriction will also pause civilian hiring at DoD installations and components for persons who do not reside within the hiring entity's local commuting area.
Additionally, service members will be authorized local leave only, following Service guidelines. This new guidance is effective March 16 and continues through May 11.

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U.S. Forces Honing Arctic Warfare Skills in Norway's High North in Exercise Cold Response 20

 

BOBLINGEN, Germany, March 3, 2020 -

Nearly 1,500 U.S. service members are taking take part in Exercise Cold Response 20 in Norway from March 9-18.The U.S. is represented by service members from the United States Marine Corps, the United States Navy, the United States Army, and the United States Air Force who have joined forces with Norway and eight other allied and partner nations.In total, some 15,000 personnel will take part in this large-scale, tactical field training exercise, which is being hosted by the Kingdom of Norway. Cold Response 20 is designed to enhance military capabilities and allied cooperation in high-intensity warfighting in a challenging Arctic environment with rugged terrain and extreme cold weather.

This exercise  is emphasizing and testing critical activities ranging from the reception of allied and partner reinforcements and command and control interoperability to combined joint combat operations, force sustainment, and combat logistics. The United States stands firm with its ally Norway and its allies and partners in Europe in this exercise in the strategically important arctic region.

Story from Marine Corps Forces Europe

A day in the life of an A-10 fighter pilot

Spend a day flying with Capt. Mike Shufeldt, one of the Idaho National Guard’s A-10 Thunderbolt II pilots, and feel firsthand what it is like to be an A-10 fighter pilot. Photo by Master Sgt. Becky VanshurSpend a day flying with Capt. Mike Shufeldt, one of the Idaho National Guard’s A-10 Thunderbolt II pilots, and feel firsthand what it is like to be an A-10 fighter pilot.
Photo by Master Sgt. Becky Vanshur

BOISE AIR TERMINAL AIR GUARD STATION, Idaho – Spend a day flying with Capt. Mike Shufeldt, one of the Idaho National Guard’s A-10 Thunderbolt II pilots, and feel firsthand what it is like to be an A-10 fighter pilot.

He can smell the strong scent of coffee brewing from the kitchen, as he brushes his teeth. It’s early in the morning, but his dog, Poppy, sits at his heels patiently waiting with a ball in her mouth and tail wagging. Shufeldt grabs his thermos of coffee, throws the ball a couple of times for Poppy, pats her furry head and walks out the door.

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Here’s Why Army Helicopters Have Native American Names

By Katie Lange of DoD - You may have noticed there’s a pattern in U.S. Army helicopter names – Apache, Black Hawk, Chinook and others. These crucial aircraft are all named after Native American tribes or figures.

But have you ever wondered why?

The AH-64E Apache helicopter is designed to increase power margins, reliability and lethality to ensure the Apache is a viable combat fighting force in large-scale combat operations. The AH-64E Apache helicopter is considered the bridging strategy to the Army’s Future Vertical Lift program. Photo by Pfc. Chantel GreenThe AH-64E Apache helicopter is designed to increase power margins, reliability and lethality to ensure the Apache is a viable combat fighting force in large-scale combat operations. The AH-64E Apache helicopter is considered the bridging strategy to the Army’s Future Vertical Lift program.
Photo by Pfc. Chantel Green

The U.S. military has a long history with Native Americans. Armed conflicts between the two were commonly known as the American Indian Wars and were fought intermittently from the time the U.S. was first settled by Europeans to early in the 20th century. But Native Americans also served as some of the fiercest fighters for the United States for more than 200 years. In fact, 32 Native Americans have earned the nation’s highest military award, the Medal of Honor.

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