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Blatind, Norway. (October 15, 2022): In this photo by Corporal Patrick King, U.S. Marines with Marine Rotational Force Europe buddy rush down range during a company live fire attack as part of Exercise Arctic Littoral Strike. These exercises focus on regional engagements in arctic and mountain warfare as America prepares to defend Europe against Russian aggression.Blatind, Norway. (October 15, 2022): In this photo by Corporal Patrick King, U.S. Marines with Marine Rotational Force Europe buddy rush down range during a company live fire attack as part of Exercise Arctic Littoral Strike. These exercises focus on regional engagements in arctic and mountain warfare as America prepares to defend Europe against Russian aggression.

Blatind, Norway. (October 15, 2022): Since 1825, America and Norway have enjoyed a close and mutually beneficial relationship that continues today. The two nations fought together in World War II and the Norwegians are co-founders of both the United Nations and NATO. Norwegian troops deployed trainers to Iraq to support America in Operation Inherent Resolve and they provided training and advice alongside American troops in Afghanistan.

Since 2017, Norway has hosted annual rotations of  U.S. Marines to train in extreme cold and in mountainous terrain with the Norwegian Armed Forces. This arrangement has become even more vital as NATO confronts potential aggression from the Russians after their invasion of Ukraine. American military planners have pre-positioned armored vehicles, ammunition, and basic supplies in Norway to facilitate the rapid deployment of Marines in an emergency.

South Goulburn Island, Australia. (October 10, 2022): In this photo by Corporal Emeline Mola, U.S. Marines with India Company, 3rd Battalion, 7th Marines arrive in Australia ferried by Tiltrotor Squadron 268 Reinforced MV-22 Osprey aircraft. The Marines are participating in Expeditionary Base Operations exercises as part of Marine Rotational Force Darwin 22, a 25-year defense pact with one of America’s oldest friends.South Goulburn Island, Australia. (October 10, 2022): In this photo by Corporal Emeline Mola, U.S. Marines with India Company, 3rd Battalion, 7th Marines arrive in Australia ferried by Tiltrotor Squadron 268 Reinforced MV-22 Osprey aircraft. The Marines are participating in Expeditionary Base Operations exercises as part of Marine Rotational Force Darwin 22, a 25-year defense pact with one of America’s oldest friends.

South Goulburn Island, Australia. (October 10, 2022): Never doubt, the Aussies have always had America’s back. Australian servicemembers have fought alongside U.S. troops in both World Wars, Korea, Viet Nam, Iraq, and Afghanistan shedding their blood for the cause of freedom. In these tense times, the Americans want Australians to know that we will be a reliable ally should they need us.

This is why the U.S. 7th Marine Regiment routinely deploys to Australia’s Outback from Kaneohe, Hawaii on a rotating basis to train with Aussie Marines. Dubbed the “Magnificent 7th , this Marine regiment defended Australia from invading Japanese forces in World War II. In 1942, the regiment landed on the Solomon Islands to fight the Battle for Guadalcanal, a four-month slug fest fending off fanatical Japanese defenders, repulsing their Banzai charges and suicidal attacks. It was during these battles that Lewis Burwell “Chesty” Puller, probably the most famous Marine in history, won the first of five Navy Crosses. He would retire a Lieutenant General after a thirty-seven-year career and remains the most decorated Marine of all time.

By January 1943, the majority of Marines from the Magnificent 7th suffered from malaria, wounds, and just plain fatigue.  The regiment arrived in Australia to rest and retrain, not for a liberty call, yet a grateful Australian population gave the regiment a hero’s welcome. The seventh went on to fight at New Guinea, New Britain, Peleliu, and the Island of Okinawa, Japan.

America is fortunate to have a reliable ally like Australia as we confront threats from China in the Indo Pacific. American servicemembers are lucky to have patriots, like you, to support them while they are deployed overseas. Please take a moment, right now, to show your support for America’s finest by contributing funds to Support Our Troops’ Patriot Brigade®. Here you will join thousands of Americans who make monthly donations to pay for comfort items and recreational programs for our military deployed overseas. Please go to our secure website https://supportourtroops.org/donate to contribute to America’s finest today!

Baltic Sea. (October 12, 2022): In this photo by Corporal Yvonna Guyette, a U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey assigned to the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) approaches the flight deck during flight operations aboard the Wasp-Class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge. The 22nd MEU is on a scheduled deployment to U.S. Naval Forces Europe to support the Sixth Fleet defending American and allied partners in the Baltic Sea.Baltic Sea. (October 12, 2022): In this photo by Corporal Yvonna Guyette, a U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey assigned to the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) approaches the flight deck during flight operations aboard the Wasp-Class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge. The 22nd MEU is on a scheduled deployment to U.S. Naval Forces Europe to support the Sixth Fleet defending American and allied partners in the Baltic Sea.

Baltic Sea. (October 12, 2022): Since Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered the illegal and immoral invasion of Ukraine, NATO forces have poured into the European theater. The American response to any escalation by the Russians will be spearheaded by the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), an air/ground task force of over 2,200 Marines and Navy personnel.

Hokkaido, Japan. (October 3, 2022): In this photo by Sergeant Kallahan Morris, Marine Corps Sgt. Ryan Lauritsen, a scout sniper with the 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines, fires a M107 Special Application Scoped Rifle during Exercise Resolute Dragon 22. The maneuvers are central to the U.S./Japan Alliance which stands ready to counter aggression in the South China Sea. In addition to marksmanship, Marine Scout Snipers train in land navigation, surveillance, and mission planning at Quantico, Virginia.Hokkaido, Japan. (October 3, 2022): In this photo by Sergeant Kallahan Morris, Marine Corps Sgt. Ryan Lauritsen, a scout sniper with the 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines, fires a M107 Special Application Scoped Rifle during Exercise Resolute Dragon 22. The maneuvers are central to the U.S./Japan Alliance which stands ready to counter aggression in the South China Sea. In addition to marksmanship, Marine Scout Snipers train in land navigation, surveillance, and mission planning at Quantico, Virginia.

Hokkaido, Japan. (October 3, 2022): Their presence sends chills down the spines of enemy soldiers. They are a hidden threat, stealthy and deadly accurate “hunters of gunmen.” But there is much more to becoming a Marine Scout Sniper than excellent marksmanship.

Working in teams, Scout Snipers deliver long range precision fire on targets from concealed positions and are often the most dreaded combatants on the field. These highly skilled Marines can stalk a specific target or provide overwatch for maneuvering units while collecting vital information that often turns the tide of battle.

American Marine Scout Snipers are trained at Quantico, Virginia in an 80-day course that tests their physical and mental abilities to the maximum. To qualify, a candidate must have completed Marine Basic and Advanced Infantry training, be extremely physically fit, and must volunteer for the duty. Sniper Schools candidates are unofficially referred to as “PIGs” (Professionally Instructed Gunmen) until they pass the rigorous course where the earn the moniker “HOGs” (Hunters of Gunmen).

Fort Bonifacio, Philippines. (October 12, 2022) In this photo by Corporal Ujian Gosun, Marine Corporal Brandon Sell, a radio operator with the 3rd Marine Division, practices using a Mini-Secure Communications Controller with Philippine Marines. This secure communications device can simultaneously connect with many distinct types of allied radios, even cell phones.  American and Filipino Marines are participating in Kamandag exercises or “Cooperation of the Warriors of the Sea,” to strengthen interoperability, trust, and cooperation built over decades of shared experiences.Fort Bonifacio, Philippines. (October 12, 2022) In this photo by Corporal Ujian Gosun, Marine Corporal Brandon Sell, a radio operator with the 3rd Marine Division, practices using a Mini-Secure Communications Controller with Philippine Marines. This secure communications device can simultaneously connect with many distinct types of allied radios, even cell phones. American and Filipino Marines are participating in Kamandag exercises or “Cooperation of the Warriors of the Sea,” to strengthen interoperability, trust, and cooperation built over decades of shared experiences.

Fort Bonifacio, Philippines. (October 12, 2022): It is one of the oldest military alliances in our history, a brotherhood of two nations that shed blood for each other. From General McArthur’s famous pledge to return to rescue the Filipino people from the clutches of the Japanese to facing down China today, America and the Philippines have a bond lasting generations.

The U.S./Filipino alliance is being tested anew as the Chinese aggressively pursue territorial disputes in the South China Sea.  China has asserted historical claims against the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia, Indonesia, Viet Nam, and Taiwan to dominate the region. Facing these threats is the Filipino Armed Forces that includes an Army ground force estimated at 90,000 soldiers backed by 120,000 ready reserves. The Air Force has an estimated 17,000 personnel and operates 203 aircraft, the Navy has around 25,000 members.

Homestead, FL. (October 1, 2022):  In this photo by Sergeant First Class Shane Klestinski, Army Sergeant Major Gregory Henson, right,  and Lieutenant Colonel Craig Henson of the 50th Regional Support Group make final plans for deploying Florida National Guard units to respond to Hurricane Ian. Thousands of well-disciplined troops deployed to the hardest hit counties, something these troops are eager to do.Homestead, FL. (October 1, 2022): In this photo by Sergeant First Class Shane Klestinski, Army Sergeant Major Gregory Henson, right, and Lieutenant Colonel Craig Henson of the 50th Regional Support Group make final plans for deploying Florida National Guard units to respond to Hurricane Ian. Thousands of well-disciplined troops deployed to the hardest hit counties, something these troops are eager to do.

Homestead, FL. (October 1, 2022):  They have families and homes. They own businesses and are respected members of their community. They also have dedicated a significant part of their lives to helping their neighbors and their nation in times of crisis.

When Hurricane Ian slammed into Florida’s west coast last week, most of those affected by the storm had little time to think about the Florida National Guard and its role responding to civil emergencies, but the Guard already had them in their sights.

Take the 50th Regional Support Group (RSG), for example. Days before the storm hit, the Florida Guard’s senior leaders were already meeting to order deployments of critical personnel to areas where they would be needed the most. Critical relief supplies, ranging from fresh water to thousands of gallons of fuel, were pre-positioned to be available immediately after the storm subsided. Based in Homestead, Florida, the 50th RSG has several subordinate commands, each with its own specialty in relief operations. All these assets are coordinated through the state’s Emergency Operations Centers that are the home base for the National Guard’s response efforts.

Florida National Guard missions include search and rescue, managing distribution points to disperse needed supplies, and working with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to assess storm damage.

At Support Our Troops, one of our primary missions is to educated fellow Americans about their military and the fine deeds they do for their neighbors and their country. Won’t you consider showing your support for our Guard and Reserves by contributing funds to Support Our Troops’ Patriot Brigade®. Here you will join thousands of Americans who make monthly donations to pay for comfort items and recreational programs for our National Guard and Active-Duty military deployed overseas. Please go to our secure website https://supportourtroops.org/donate to contribute to America’s finest today!

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